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Missing

Ashley LaShay Jones










Missing Person Case September 2021



Missing Person Case September 2021


Ashley, approximately 1996; Age when reported missing: 25 (approximately 2017)




Date reported missing : 09/16/1996

Missing location (approx) :
Memphis, Tennessee
Missing classification : Endangered Missing
Gender : Female
Ethnicity :
White


DOB : 04/20/1992 (29)
Age at the time of disappearance: 4 years old
Height / Weight : 3'4, 40 pounds
Distinguishing characteristics, birthmarks, tattoos : Caucasian female. Blonde hair, blue eyes. Ashley has a strawberry birthmark on the nape of her neck. Her middle name may be spelled "La Shay" or "Lashay."





Information on the case from local sources, may or may not be correct : Ashley was last seen at her family's residence in Memphis, Tennessee on September 16, 1996. Her aunt, Joyce Wade Lindsey, arrived at her home the previous day for a visit.
Lindsey was having personal problems at the time and her sister, Vicky Lee Morris (who is also Ashley's mother) allowed Lindsey to stay with her family. Lindsey and Ashley met for the first time during this visit and seemed to get along well.
Lindsey received permission from Vicky to watch Ashley during the day on September 16. Vicky called Ashley's babysitter and told her that Ashley would not be arriving that day as scheduled. She also agreed to allow Lindsey to take Ashley and her older half-sister, Erica Nicole Manning, shopping after Manning returned home from school.
Vicky called Lindsey at approximately 9:15 a.m. on September 16 and was told everything was fine. Vicky told investigators later that she thought she heard Ashley playing in the background during the conversation. This is the last time anyone has heard from Ashley.
Manning arrived home at approximately 3:15 p.m. She noticed that Lindsey was drinking alcohol and was intoxicated. Manning inquired as to Ashley's whereabouts; Lindsey told Manning that her sister had been picked up by someone, she assumed the child's regular babysitter earlier in the day.
Lindsey escorted Manning out of the home and began driving while intoxicated. She told Manning to call her parents' home and tell them that they were shopping and staying overnight at a motel. Lindsey continued driving and refused to allow Manning to phone her parents later in the evening after they checked into a motel.
The following day, September 17, Manning and Lindsey visited a laundromat and washed bags of clothes placed in Lindsey's trunk. Manning later told authorities that her aunt left her at the laundromat while Lindsey took her vehicle to a local car wash.
Manning noted that the car was still dirty when Lindsey returned, but a strong odor of bleach was present in the trunk. Lindsey claimed that the car wash was crowded and she spilled a bottle of bleach inside the vehicle.
Lindsey drove Manning back to her family's home in Memphis later that afternoon, then sped away. Vicky and her husband, Carl Morris, had already filed missing children reports on both Manning and Ashley with the police department by that time.
Vicky and Carl learned that Ashley was not with Manning at that point and knew Lindsey had lied regarding the babysitter retrieving Ashley from their house the day before. Carl chased Lindsey in his own car and brought her back to their home while Vicky called the authorities.
Investigators stated that Lindsey attempted to leave the premises while being questioned about Ashley's whereabouts. They discovered a loaded pistol in her purse and also noticed the bleach odor in her vehicle.
Lindsey was arrested for kidnapping Manning and her vehicle was thoroughly examined. Blood stains were present in the trunk of the car. DNA analysis proved that the blood belonged to Ashley.
Second-degree murder charges were filed against Lindsey in the case of Ashley's presumed death. Lindsey was also charged with theft and forgery when authorities located Vicky's checkbook, checks and a ring in the car. Lindsey was convicted on all counts in 1999.
Lindsey has maintained that she never murdered Ashley. She stated that Ashley cut her hand on a piece of broken glass inside Lindsey's vehicle on September 16, the day she was last seen. Lindsey claimed that Ashley was waving her arms around while she attempted to administer first aid to the child, thereby causing the blood stains to appear in her car. Authorities did not believe her story.
Vicky testified at Lindsey's trial and her comments may have proven a possible motive for Lindsey's crimes. Vicky stated that she accepted custody of Lindsey's daughter in 1989, but was unable to afford to keep her for an extended period of time.
Vicky released the child back into the custody of the state. The child's father was then awarded custody of the girl. Lindsey, who was not able to care for her daughter herself, was reportedly furious with Vicky's decision. She allegedly told Vicky that she "ruined" her life. Vicky also maintained that Lindsey believed Ashley resembled her daughter.
Ashley has never been located. Lindsey's appeal was denied in 1999 and she continues to serve her prison sentence.


Other information and links : ncy

Shelby County Sheriff's Office
901-576-5600



September 2021 updates and sources

Missing Children’s Statistics One Missing Child Is One Too Many The lack of a common definition of “missing child,” and a common response to the issue, results in few reliable statistics on the scope of the problem around the world. Even with this challenge, we know that: In Australia, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Australian Federal Police, National Coordination Centre. In Canada, an estimated 45,288 children are reported missing each year. Government of Canada, Canada’s Missing – 2015 Fast Fact Sheet. In Germany, an estimated 100,000 children are reported missing each year. Initiative Vermisste Kinder. In India, an estimated 96,000 children go missing each year. Bachpan Bachao Andolan, Missing Children of India. In Jamaica, an estimated 1,984 children were reporting missing in 2015. Jamaica’s Office of Children’s Registry In Russia, an estimated 45,000 children were reported missing in 2015. Interview with Pavel Astakhov MIA “Russia Today”, Apr. 4, 2016. In Spain, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Spain Joins EU Hotline for Missing Children, Sep. 22, 2010. In the United Kingdom, an estimated 112,853 children are reported missing every year. National Crime Agency, UK Missing Persons Bureau. In the United States, an estimated 460,000 children are reported missing every year. Federal Bureau of Investigation, Missing Children’s Statistics One Missing Child Is One Too Many The lack of a common definition of “missing child,” and a common response to the issue, results in few reliable statistics on the scope of the problem around the world. Even with this challenge, we know that: In Australia, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Australian Federal Police, National Coordination Centre. In Canada, an estimated 45,288 children are reported missing each year. Government of Canada, Canada’s Missing – 2015 Fast Fact Sheet. In Germany, an estimated 100,000 children are reported missing each year. Initiative Vermisste Kinder. In India, an estimated 96,000 children go missing each year. Bachpan Bachao Andolan, Missing Children of India. In Jamaica, an estimated 1,984 children were reporting missing in 2015. Jamaica’s Office of Children’s Registry In Russia, an estimated 45,000 children were reported missing in 2015. Interview with Pavel Astakhov MIA “Russia Today”, Apr. 4, 2016. In Spain, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Spain Joins EU Hotline for Missing Children, Sep. 22, 2010. In the United Kingdom, an estimated 112,853 children are reported missing every year. National Crime Agency, UK Missing Persons Bureau. In the United States, an estimated 460,000 children are reported missing every year. Federal Bureau of Investigation, NCIC. This, however, is only a snapshot of the problem. In many countries, statistics on missing children are not even available; and, unfortunately, even available statistics may be inaccurate due to: under-reporting/under-recognition; inflation; incorrect database entry of case information; and deletion of records once a case is closed. The lack of numbers, and the discrepancy in the numbers that do exist, is one of the key reasons why ICMEC developed and advocates for the Model Missing Child Framework, which assists countries with building strong, well-rounded national responses, and facilitates more efficient investigations, management, and resolution of missing children cases. We firmly believe that one missing child is one too many, and we are committed to improving the global understanding of and response to missing and abducted children. Here is a look at missing children in the United States. There are several different types of missing children: runaways, family abductions, lost or “thrown away” and non-family abductions. Advances in technology, communications through public alerts and greater cooperation from law enforcement have facilitated the recovery process. Statistics According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Missing Person File, there are 89,637 active missing person records, of which juveniles under the age of 18 account for 30,396 (34%) of the records. (as of December 31, 2020) AMBER Alert “AMBER (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alerts are emergency messages broadcast when a law enforcement agency determines that a child has been abducted and is in imminent danger. The broadcasts include information about the child and the abductor, including physical descriptions as well as information about the abductor’s vehicle - which could lead to the child’s recovery.” The AMBER Alert system began in 1996 and was named in honor of Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old who was abducted in Arlington, Texas, and murdered. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands have AMBER Alert plans in place to help find missing children in danger. As of December 2020, the AMBER Alert program has been credited with the safe recovery of 1029 children.. This, however, is only a snapshot of the problem. In many countries, statistics on missing children are not even available; and, unfortunately, even available statistics may be inaccurate due to: under-reporting/under-recognition; inflation; incorrect database entry of case information; and deletion of records once a case is closed. The lack of numbers, and the discrepancy in the numbers that do exist, is one of the key reasons why ICMEC developed and advocates for the Model Missing Child Framework, which assists countries with building strong, well-rounded national responses, and facilitates more efficient investigations, management, and resolution of missing children cases. We firmly believe that one missing child is one too many, and we are committed to improving the global understanding of and response to missing and abducted children. Here is a look at missing children in the United States. There are several different types of missing children: runaways, family abductions, lost or “thrown away” and non-family abductions. Advances in technology, communications through public alerts and greater cooperation from law enforcement have facilitated the recovery process. Statistics According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (Missing Children’s Statistics One Missing Child Is One Too Many The lack of a common definition of “missing child,” and a common response to the issue, results in few reliable statistics on the scope of the problem around the world. Even with this challenge, we know that: In Australia, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Australian Federal Police, National Coordination Centre. In Canada, an estimated 45,288 children are reported missing each year. Government of Canada, Canada’s Missing – 2015 Fast Fact Sheet. In Germany, an estimated 100,000 children are reported missing each year. Initiative Vermisste Kinder. In India, an estimated 96,000 children go missing each year. Bachpan Bachao Andolan, Missing Children of India. In Jamaica, an estimated 1,984 children were reporting missing in 2015. Jamaica’s Office of Children’s Registry In Russia, an estimated 45,000 children were reported missing in 2015. Interview with Pavel Astakhov MIA “Russia Today”, Apr. 4, 2016. In Spain, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Spain Joins EU Hotline for Missing Children, Sep. 22, 2010. In the United Kingdom, an estimated 112,853 children are reported missing every year. National Crime Agency, UK Missing Persons Bureau. In the United States, an estimated 460,000 children are reported missing every year. Federal Bureau of Investigation, NCIC. This, however, is only a snapshot of the problem. In many countries, statistics on missing children are not even available; and, unfortunately, even available statistics may be inaccurate due to: under-reporting/under-recognition; inflation; incorrect database entry of case information; and deletion of records once a case is closed. The lack of numbers, and the discrepancy in the numbers that do exist, is one of the key reasons why ICMEC developed and advocates for the Model Missing Child Framework, which assists countries with building strong, well-rounded national responses, and facilitates more efficient investigations, management, and resolution of missing children cases. We firmly believe that one missing child is one too many, and we are committed to improving the global understanding of and response to missing and abducted children. Here is a look at missing children in the United States. There are several different types of missing children: runaways, family abductions, lost or “thrown away” and non-family abductions. Advances in technology, communications through public alerts and greater cooperation from law enforcement have facilitated the recovery process. Statistics According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Missing Person File, there are 89,637 active missing person records, of which juveniles under the age of 18 account for 30,396 (34%) of the records. (as of December 31, 2020) AMBER Alert “AMBER (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alerts are emergency messages broadcast when a law enforcement agency determines that a child has been abducted and is in imminent danger. The broadcasts include information about the child and the abductor, including physical descriptions as well as information about the abductor’s vehicle - which could lead to the child’s recovery.” The AMBER Alert system began in 1996 and was named in honor of Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old who was abducted in Arlington, Texas, and murdered. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands have AMBER Alert plans in place to help find missing children in danger. As of December 2020, the AMBER Alert program has been credited with the safe recovery of 1029 children.) Missing Person File, there are 89,637 active missing person records, of which juveniles under the age of 18 account for 30,396 (34%) of the records. (as of December 31, 2020) AMBER Alert “AMBER (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alerts are emergency messages broadcast when a law enforcement agency determines that a child has been abducted and is in imminent danger. The broadcasts include information about the child and the abductor, including physical descriptions as well as information about the abductor’s vehicle - which could lead to the child’s recovery.” The AMBER Alert system began in 1996 and was named in honor of Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old who was abducted in Arlington, Texas, and murdered. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands have AMBER Alert plans in place to help find missing children in danger. As of December 2020, the AMBER Alert program has been credited with the safe recovery of 1029 children.
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