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Missing

Corey James Edkin










Missing Person Case September 2021



Missing Person Case September 2021



Missing Person Case September 2021



Missing Person Case September 2021


Corey, approximately 1986; Age when reported missing: 34 (approximately 2018)




Date reported missing : 10/12/1986

Missing location (approx) :
New Columbia, Pennsylvania
Missing classification : Non-Family Abduction
Gender : Male
Ethnicity :
White


DOB : 06/11/1984 (37)
Age at the time of disappearance: 2 years old
Height / Weight : 3'0, 30 pounds
Description, clothing, jewerly and more : Gray pajama pants, a short-sleeved white pajama top with an imAge at the time of disappearance: of a cartoon beaver imprinted on the front, and no shoes or socks.
Distinguishing characteristics, birthmarks, tattoos : Caucasian male. Blond hair, blue eyes. Corey's hair is very light in color.





Information on the case from local sources, may or may not be correct : Corey was last seen at the residence he shared with his mother, Debbie S. Derr, on Second Street in New Columbia, Pennsylvania on October 12, 1986. They lived with Corey's sister; a roommate, Alberta Sones; and Sones's two young children.
Derr left Corey asleep in her upstairs bedroom while she went to a nearby convenience store for a pizza at approximately 12:10 a.m. Corey's sister, Sones, and Sones's children at the residence at the time. Sones was awake and watching television, and the four children were all asleep.
Derr returned at approximately 12:40 a.m. and discovered that her son had disappeared and the door was open. Sones told authorities that she didn't see Corey leave the house or anyone enter the house while his mother was away, and never heard any strange noises. Corey's mother called the police at 1:10 a.m. The child has never been seen again.
At the time of Corey's disappearance, his parents were divorced and he had limited contact with his father. Authorities confirmed that Derr did go to the convenience store during the time she said, and Sones passed a polygraph test, as did several other people close to Corey's family. Neither of Corey's parents is a suspect in his disappearance. Several ransom calls were made to different members of Corey's family after he went missing; his grandmother claimed she got a ransom call from a woman as late as January 1991. The caller(s) were never identified.
Authorities believe Corey may have been abducted by a non-family member. His case remains unsolved.


Other information and links : ncy

Pennsylvania State Police
717-742-8761



September 2021 updates and sources

Missing Children’s Statistics One Missing Child Is One Too Many The lack of a common definition of “missing child,” and a common response to the issue, results in few reliable statistics on the scope of the problem around the world. Even with this challenge, we know that: In Australia, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Australian Federal Police, National Coordination Centre. In Canada, an estimated 45,288 children are reported missing each year. Government of Canada, Canada’s Missing – 2015 Fast Fact Sheet. In Germany, an estimated 100,000 children are reported missing each year. Initiative Vermisste Kinder. In India, an estimated 96,000 children go missing each year. Bachpan Bachao Andolan, Missing Children of India. In Jamaica, an estimated 1,984 children were reporting missing in 2015. Jamaica’s Office of Children’s Registry In Russia, an estimated 45,000 children were reported missing in 2015. Interview with Pavel Astakhov MIA “Russia Today”, Apr. 4, 2016. In Spain, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Spain Joins EU Hotline for Missing Children, Sep. 22, 2010. In the United Kingdom, an estimated 112,853 children are reported missing every year. National Crime Agency, UK Missing Persons Bureau. In the United States, an estimated 460,000 children are reported missing every year. Federal Bureau of Investigation, Missing Children’s Statistics One Missing Child Is One Too Many The lack of a common definition of “missing child,” and a common response to the issue, results in few reliable statistics on the scope of the problem around the world. Even with this challenge, we know that: In Australia, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Australian Federal Police, National Coordination Centre. In Canada, an estimated 45,288 children are reported missing each year. Government of Canada, Canada’s Missing – 2015 Fast Fact Sheet. In Germany, an estimated 100,000 children are reported missing each year. Initiative Vermisste Kinder. In India, an estimated 96,000 children go missing each year. Bachpan Bachao Andolan, Missing Children of India. In Jamaica, an estimated 1,984 children were reporting missing in 2015. Jamaica’s Office of Children’s Registry In Russia, an estimated 45,000 children were reported missing in 2015. Interview with Pavel Astakhov MIA “Russia Today”, Apr. 4, 2016. In Spain, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Spain Joins EU Hotline for Missing Children, Sep. 22, 2010. In the United Kingdom, an estimated 112,853 children are reported missing every year. National Crime Agency, UK Missing Persons Bureau. In the United States, an estimated 460,000 children are reported missing every year. Federal Bureau of Investigation, NCIC. This, however, is only a snapshot of the problem. In many countries, statistics on missing children are not even available; and, unfortunately, even available statistics may be inaccurate due to: under-reporting/under-recognition; inflation; incorrect database entry of case information; and deletion of records once a case is closed. The lack of numbers, and the discrepancy in the numbers that do exist, is one of the key reasons why ICMEC developed and advocates for the Model Missing Child Framework, which assists countries with building strong, well-rounded national responses, and facilitates more efficient investigations, management, and resolution of missing children cases. We firmly believe that one missing child is one too many, and we are committed to improving the global understanding of and response to missing and abducted children. Here is a look at missing children in the United States. There are several different types of missing children: runaways, family abductions, lost or “thrown away” and non-family abductions. Advances in technology, communications through public alerts and greater cooperation from law enforcement have facilitated the recovery process. Statistics According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Missing Person File, there are 89,637 active missing person records, of which juveniles under the age of 18 account for 30,396 (34%) of the records. (as of December 31, 2020) AMBER Alert “AMBER (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alerts are emergency messages broadcast when a law enforcement agency determines that a child has been abducted and is in imminent danger. The broadcasts include information about the child and the abductor, including physical descriptions as well as information about the abductor’s vehicle - which could lead to the child’s recovery.” The AMBER Alert system began in 1996 and was named in honor of Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old who was abducted in Arlington, Texas, and murdered. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands have AMBER Alert plans in place to help find missing children in danger. As of December 2020, the AMBER Alert program has been credited with the safe recovery of 1029 children.. This, however, is only a snapshot of the problem. In many countries, statistics on missing children are not even available; and, unfortunately, even available statistics may be inaccurate due to: under-reporting/under-recognition; inflation; incorrect database entry of case information; and deletion of records once a case is closed. The lack of numbers, and the discrepancy in the numbers that do exist, is one of the key reasons why ICMEC developed and advocates for the Model Missing Child Framework, which assists countries with building strong, well-rounded national responses, and facilitates more efficient investigations, management, and resolution of missing children cases. We firmly believe that one missing child is one too many, and we are committed to improving the global understanding of and response to missing and abducted children. Here is a look at missing children in the United States. There are several different types of missing children: runaways, family abductions, lost or “thrown away” and non-family abductions. Advances in technology, communications through public alerts and greater cooperation from law enforcement have facilitated the recovery process. Statistics According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (Missing Children’s Statistics One Missing Child Is One Too Many The lack of a common definition of “missing child,” and a common response to the issue, results in few reliable statistics on the scope of the problem around the world. Even with this challenge, we know that: In Australia, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Australian Federal Police, National Coordination Centre. In Canada, an estimated 45,288 children are reported missing each year. Government of Canada, Canada’s Missing – 2015 Fast Fact Sheet. In Germany, an estimated 100,000 children are reported missing each year. Initiative Vermisste Kinder. In India, an estimated 96,000 children go missing each year. Bachpan Bachao Andolan, Missing Children of India. In Jamaica, an estimated 1,984 children were reporting missing in 2015. Jamaica’s Office of Children’s Registry In Russia, an estimated 45,000 children were reported missing in 2015. Interview with Pavel Astakhov MIA “Russia Today”, Apr. 4, 2016. In Spain, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Spain Joins EU Hotline for Missing Children, Sep. 22, 2010. In the United Kingdom, an estimated 112,853 children are reported missing every year. National Crime Agency, UK Missing Persons Bureau. In the United States, an estimated 460,000 children are reported missing every year. Federal Bureau of Investigation, NCIC. This, however, is only a snapshot of the problem. In many countries, statistics on missing children are not even available; and, unfortunately, even available statistics may be inaccurate due to: under-reporting/under-recognition; inflation; incorrect database entry of case information; and deletion of records once a case is closed. The lack of numbers, and the discrepancy in the numbers that do exist, is one of the key reasons why ICMEC developed and advocates for the Model Missing Child Framework, which assists countries with building strong, well-rounded national responses, and facilitates more efficient investigations, management, and resolution of missing children cases. We firmly believe that one missing child is one too many, and we are committed to improving the global understanding of and response to missing and abducted children. Here is a look at missing children in the United States. There are several different types of missing children: runaways, family abductions, lost or “thrown away” and non-family abductions. Advances in technology, communications through public alerts and greater cooperation from law enforcement have facilitated the recovery process. Statistics According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Missing Person File, there are 89,637 active missing person records, of which juveniles under the age of 18 account for 30,396 (34%) of the records. (as of December 31, 2020) AMBER Alert “AMBER (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alerts are emergency messages broadcast when a law enforcement agency determines that a child has been abducted and is in imminent danger. The broadcasts include information about the child and the abductor, including physical descriptions as well as information about the abductor’s vehicle - which could lead to the child’s recovery.” The AMBER Alert system began in 1996 and was named in honor of Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old who was abducted in Arlington, Texas, and murdered. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands have AMBER Alert plans in place to help find missing children in danger. As of December 2020, the AMBER Alert program has been credited with the safe recovery of 1029 children.) Missing Person File, there are 89,637 active missing person records, of which juveniles under the age of 18 account for 30,396 (34%) of the records. (as of December 31, 2020) AMBER Alert “AMBER (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alerts are emergency messages broadcast when a law enforcement agency determines that a child has been abducted and is in imminent danger. The broadcasts include information about the child and the abductor, including physical descriptions as well as information about the abductor’s vehicle - which could lead to the child’s recovery.” The AMBER Alert system began in 1996 and was named in honor of Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old who was abducted in Arlington, Texas, and murdered. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands have AMBER Alert plans in place to help find missing children in danger. As of December 2020, the AMBER Alert program has been credited with the safe recovery of 1029 children.
Child Protection Education of America
New York State Missing and Exploited Children Clearinghouse
A missing person is a person who has disappeared and whose status as alive or dead cannot be confirmed as their location and condition are not known. A person may go missing through a voluntary disappearance, or else due to an accident, crime, death in a location where they cannot be found (such as at sea), or many other reasons. In most parts of the world, a missing person will usually be found quickly. While criminal abductions are some of the most widely reported missing person cases, these account for only 2–5% of missing children in Europe. By contrast, some missing person cases remain unresolved for many years. Laws related to these cases are often complex since, in many jurisdictions, relatives and third parties may not deal with a person's assets until their death is considered proven by law and a formal death certificate issued. The situation, uncertainties, and lack of closure or a funeral resulting when a person goes missing may be extremely painful with long-lasting effects on family and friends. Several organizations seek to connect, share best practices, and disseminate information and imAge at the time of disappearance: s of missing children to improve the effectiveness of missing children investigations, including the International Commission on Missing Persons, the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children (ICMEC), as well as national organizations, including the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children in the US, Missing People in the UK, Child Focus in Belgium, and The Smile of the Child in Greece.
CrimeNews 2000
Child Search Ministries
The Daily Item
The Harrisburg Patriot News
Medium












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